THE BASSET HOUND

Basset hound
  • HISTORY
  • APPEARANCE
  • CHARACTER
  • STANDARD

The name of the breed comes from the French word “bass,” which means low, dwarf. Its origin can be traced far back. In Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, he already mentions bassets. It has its roots in France and its ancestor is the Basset Artésien Normand. The first two specimens came to England in 1866, where Sir Everett Millais and a few more enthusiastic breeders began to deal with him. Because the herd consisted of only a few bassets for a long time, they were forced to use close relative cultures, with a number of negative consequences. This made it necessary to cross with an alien breed and the breeders at the time eventually opted for the bloodhound. An English Blood Bitch was inseminated with a basset hound male, and 12 pups were born from the mating, and then basset female was mated with males from this litter.

Interestingly, these matings resulted in mostly black-and-tan (black-tan), heavy-boned, awkward puppies. It took four generations for the traces of alien blood refreshment to disappear and for tricolor dogs to be born entirely reminiscent of bassets. English breeders continued to breed lower, heavier bone bassets, and it was in the course of this work that the basset hound, a form of the basset hound known and popular today, developed.

It appeared in Hungary in the seventies. Judge Borbála Sártory was the first breeder to bring the first dogs to Hungary from Poland. Subsequently, the starting stock came from Poland and Czechoslovakia. His popularity in Hungary is mainly due to Lieutenant Colombo. The dog that pops up from time to time in the series has made the basset hound extremely well known and popular. As a result of this popularity, a great many began to deal with the variety, but unfortunately with an emphasis not on quality but rather on quantity.

Regarding the general appearance of the breed, it can be said that it has a strong physique, is muscular and, contrary to popular belief, has a very high need for movement. Its main feature is loose skin on the head and forelimbs, as well as on the buttocks (this should not be excessive in either case), which plays an important role. Thanks to this leatheriness, they were able to sniff without injuring the usually prickly, prickly undergrowth during the basset hunt, and to drive out game from there.

Their “sad” gaze can be attributed to the diamond-shaped eyes and slightly drooping lower eyelids, thus well disguising the unbridled joy of life that characterizes them. Yet the overall picture is completed by velvety tactile ears pinned below the line of the eye, which almost frame the dog’s head.

Their strong physique and most of their weight is mainly made up of bones and muscles, so you should never confuse the right body weight with overweight. A perfect basset is proportionate in appearance, has a harmonious physique, and a strong - almost charismatic - individuality. Its movement is smoothly smooth, the basic conditions of which are the far-reaching steps on the front and strong thrust on the hind limb. This is assumed by the correct anatomical structure of the dog. The peculiarity of the breed is the tail carried in the shape of a sword while moving.

Its color is tricolor, ie tricolor (black-white-tan), or bicolor, or two-color (yellow-white). Tricolor bassets have been “monopolistic” in Hungary for a long time, but nowadays the bicolor version is also becoming more and more popular. The basset hound is irresistible in its overall appearance. On short legs, it is a large animal that is able to look at the owner begging with innocent sheep eyes while the skin is wrinkled on its forehead and saliva is trickling discreetly from the corner of its mouth. His voice is deep and extremely unique, “disarming” both the burglar and the dear visitor.

He is a great clown with sad eyes, drooping ears, a bottomless stomach who makes the world around him more beautiful. It is a peaceful, calm breed by nature, but very stubborn. From his pleading gaze, one immediately softens. He who knows him can never get rid of him. He disarmes the other animals with his incredible adaptability. She is kind and patient with the kids she enjoys playing with. His sense of humor is evident in many life situations. You can't get bored next to it, it's a special color spot for the family.

A herd dog that treats its owners as herd mates and it is only natural for her to try to get higher and higher in the rankings, in the hope that one day she will become the herd leader. This can manifest in a wide variety of things and, in fact, the disobedience that results from this endeavor makes them such irresistible individuals. Anyone who has a basset will often tell you that the dog is able to “pout” for hours, retreat demonstratively, and completely disregard all of the owner’s intentions to reconcile.

Many people think bassets are stupid and incomprehensible. This is not true, in their case only stubbornness coupled with incredible perseverance. If, on the other hand, we can motivate them, from that moment on, there is nothing else for them but the task to be performed - be it “cat hunting” or just “rearranging” the new garden. However, we must not forget that the basset loves its master with the same perseverance and, apart from all our human weaknesses, is a devoted companion for a lifetime.

Origin: Great Britain.

Date of issue of the original and current standard: 13.10.2010

Application: Blood.

FCI group classification: Breed group 6 - bloods and related breeds. Section 1.3 - small wear. You are required to take a job exam.

Brief Historical Overview: The basset was allegedly bred by monks to hunt in dense vegetation in medieval France and to be able to hunt with its nose close to the ground . Although a close relative of the entire family of French bassets, the breed has been perfected in England. A dog that steadily chases its natural prey, the rabbit, at a relatively slow pace over amazing distances.

General appearance:

Short-legged, well-balanced, with a remarkable weight and many excellent qualities. It's important to keep in mind that this is a working dog and should always comply with it, so it's capable of strong, active, and persistent work in the field.

Behavior and temperament :

A reliable nose-hunting herd from old bloodlines. His voice is deep, melodic. Calm, never aggressive or shy. Loving.

Head:

There may be little wrinkle on the forehead and cheeks, but the scalp should always be loose enough to wrinkle slightly when it is pulled forward or the head is bent forward.

Skull: The line of the bridge of the nose is almost parallel to that of the skull and is slightly longer than the distance between the stop and the occipital bone.

Skull: Vaulted, with prominent occipital bone. Medium width (at the eyebrows), its width gradually decreases towards the muzzle.

Stop: Mild.

Skull: Nose: The nose is completely black, except for light-colored dogs, which may be brown or liver-colored. Large and well-opened nostrils, the nasal mirror slightly beyond the lips.

Muzzle: The general appearance of the muzzle is dry but not pointed. Lips: The upper lips are well diagonal to the lower lips.

Jaws / Teeth: Strong jaw, with a perfect scissor bite, with the upper incisors close to the lower ones and standing perpendicular to the jawbone.

Eyes: Rhombus-shaped, neither protruding nor too deep set. Other shades up to medium brown are also accepted in dark but light dogs. Calm, serious look. Light or yellow eyes are not desirable.

Ears: Set low, exactly below the line of the eye. They are long, reaching the end of a muzzle of adequate length, but not excessively long. They are thin along their entire length and twist inwards. They are very flexible, delicate and velvety to the touch.

Neck : Muscular, well arched and fairly long, with a pronounced but by no means excessive neck lobe.

Trunk : Long and deep throughout. The mar and hip are at approximately the same height.

Back: Fairly wide and straight. It should not be disproportionately long between the mar and the hips.

Loins: May be slightly curved.

Chest: The forechest fits snugly in the forearm when viewed from the front. It is pronounced sternum, but the chest should be neither narrow nor disproportionately deep. The ribs are well arched, extending far back, without any deformation.

Bottom line and abdomen: There must be sufficient distance between the deepest part of the chest and the ground for the dog to move freely on any type of terrain.

Tail: Well set, rather long, strong at the base, gradually tapering towards the tip; there is a moderate amount of coarse coat on the underside. He wears it in motion in swords, gently arched, holding it upwards. Under no circumstances should you curl or lean over your back.

Limbs

Forelegs:

General Appearance: The upper forearm is set slightly below the body, but should not impede the free movement of the dog, nor should the contact of the front legs in position or movement. The skin in the middle of the foot may be slightly wrinkled, but this should not be excessive.

Shoulders: Shoulders reach well back; the shoulders are not too heavy.

Elbows: Elbows close to the side of the body, not turning inwards or outwards.

Forearm: Short, strong boned.

Feet: A forward heel is not desirable.

Forefeet: Large, well supported, with thick pads. The front paws turn straight forward or slightly outwards, but the dog always stands perfectly and regularly if its weight is evenly distributed on the toes and pads, so that his footprints give the impression of a large dog's footprints.

Hind limbs:

General appearance: Extremely muscular, almost round when viewed from behind. There may be a slight wrinkle between the hock and the paw and a small skin purse may appear at the back of the hock, but none of these should be excessive.

Knee: Well angulated. Hocks: The hocks are deep, the hindquarters slightly sloping, but not turning inwards or outwards, and just below the torso when the dog is naturally standing. / p> Hind feet: Large, well supported, with thick pads. In all cases, a dog will stand perfectly and regularly if its weight is evenly distributed on the toes and pads, so that its footprints give the impression of a large dog's footprints.

Movement: The most important thing is to make sure your dog is fit for its intended purpose. Smooth, powerful and easy movement, with protruding steps at the front, powerful thrust at the rear. The dog also moves the front and hind limbs correctly. The knee and hip joint should never appear stiff in motion and the fingers should never rub against the ground.

Skin: Loose and supple without exaggeration.

Hair cover

Hair: Smooth, short and dense without being delicate. Clean outlines without flagging. Long, soft coat and flagging are undesirable.

Color: Usually black and white-tan (tricolor); yellow and white (bicolor); but any recognized wear color is accepted.

Size: Height at withers: 33 to 38 cm.

Errors: Any deviation from the above is considered an error and should be judged in proportion to the extent to which it affects the dog's health, quality of life and ability to perform his / her traditional task / work.

Excluding errors - Aggressive or overly shy behavior - Any dog ​​with a visible physical or behavioral disorder should be excluded.

Note: Males should have two apparently normal testicles located in the scrotum.

The name of the breed comes from the French word “bass,” which means low, dwarf. Its origin can be traced far back. In Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, he already mentions bassets. It has its roots in France and its ancestor is the Basset Artésien Normand. The first two specimens came to England in 1866, where Sir Everett Millais and a few more enthusiastic breeders began to deal with him. Because the herd consisted of only a few bassets for a long time, they were forced to use close relative cultures, with a number of negative consequences. This made it necessary to cross with an alien breed and the breeders at the time eventually opted for the bloodhound. An English Blood Bitch was inseminated with a basset hound male, and 12 pups were born from the mating, and then basset female was mated with males from this litter.

Interestingly, these matings resulted in mostly black-and-tan (black-tan), heavy-boned, awkward puppies. It took four generations for the traces of alien blood refreshment to disappear and for tricolor dogs to be born entirely reminiscent of bassets. English breeders continued to breed lower, heavier bone bassets, and it was in the course of this work that the basset hound, a form of the basset hound known and popular today, developed.

It appeared in Hungary in the seventies. Judge Borbála Sártory was the first breeder to bring the first dogs to Hungary from Poland. Subsequently, the starting stock came from Poland and Czechoslovakia. His popularity in Hungary is mainly due to Lieutenant Colombo. The dog that pops up from time to time in the series has made the basset hound extremely well known and popular. As a result of this popularity, a great many began to deal with the variety, but unfortunately with an emphasis not on quality but rather on quantity.

Regarding the general appearance of the breed, it can be said that it has a strong physique, is muscular and, contrary to popular belief, has a very high need for movement. Its main feature is loose skin on the head and forelimbs, as well as on the buttocks (this should not be excessive in either case), which plays an important role. Thanks to this leatheriness, they were able to sniff without injuring the usually prickly, prickly undergrowth during the basset hunt, and to drive out game from there.

Their “sad” gaze can be attributed to the diamond-shaped eyes and slightly drooping lower eyelids, thus well disguising the unbridled joy of life that characterizes them. Yet the overall picture is completed by velvety tactile ears pinned below the line of the eye, which almost frame the dog’s head.

Their strong physique and most of their weight is mainly made up of bones and muscles, so you should never confuse the right body weight with overweight. A perfect basset is proportionate in appearance, has a harmonious physique, and a strong – almost charismatic – individuality. Its movement is smoothly smooth, the basic conditions of which are the far-reaching steps on the front and strong thrust on the hind limb. This is assumed by the correct anatomical structure of the dog. The peculiarity of the breed is the tail carried in the shape of a sword while moving.

Its color is tricolor, ie tricolor (black-white-tan), or bicolor, or two-color (yellow-white). Tricolor bassets have been “monopolistic” in Hungary for a long time, but nowadays the bicolor version is also becoming more and more popular. The basset hound is irresistible in its overall appearance. On short legs, it is a large animal that is able to look at the owner begging with innocent sheep eyes while the skin is wrinkled on its forehead and saliva is trickling discreetly from the corner of its mouth. His voice is deep and extremely unique, “disarming” both the burglar and the dear visitor.

He is a great clown with sad eyes, drooping ears, a bottomless stomach who makes the world around him more beautiful. It is a peaceful, calm breed by nature, but very stubborn. From his pleading gaze, one immediately softens. He who knows him can never get rid of him. He disarmes the other animals with his incredible adaptability. She is kind and patient with the kids she enjoys playing with. His sense of humor is evident in many life situations. You can’t get bored next to it, it’s a special color spot for the family.

A herd dog that treats its owners as herd mates and it is only natural for her to try to get higher and higher in the rankings, in the hope that one day she will become the herd leader. This can manifest in a wide variety of things and, in fact, the disobedience that results from this endeavor makes them such irresistible individuals. Anyone who has a basset will often tell you that the dog is able to “pout” for hours, retreat demonstratively, and completely disregard all of the owner’s intentions to reconcile.

Many people think bassets are stupid and incomprehensible. This is not true, in their case only stubbornness coupled with incredible perseverance. If, on the other hand, we can motivate them, from that moment on, there is nothing else for them but the task to be performed – be it “cat hunting” or just “rearranging” the new garden. However, we must not forget that the basset loves its master with the same perseverance and, apart from all our human weaknesses, is a devoted companion for a lifetime.

Origin: Great Britain.

Date of issue of the original and current standard: 13.10.2010

Application: Blood.

FCI group classification: Breed group 6 – bloods and related breeds. Section 1.3 – small wear. You are required to take a job exam.

Brief Historical Overview: The basset was allegedly bred by monks to hunt in dense vegetation in medieval France and to be able to hunt with its nose close to the ground . Although a close relative of the entire family of French bassets, the breed has been perfected in England. A dog that steadily chases its natural prey, the rabbit, at a relatively slow pace over amazing distances.

General appearance:

Short-legged, well-balanced, with a remarkable weight and many excellent qualities. It’s important to keep in mind that this is a working dog and should always comply with it, so it’s capable of strong, active, and persistent work in the field.

Behavior and temperament :

A reliable nose-hunting herd from old bloodlines. His voice is deep, melodic. Calm, never aggressive or shy. Loving.

Head:

There may be little wrinkle on the forehead and cheeks, but the scalp should always be loose enough to wrinkle slightly when it is pulled forward or the head is bent forward.

Skull: The line of the bridge of the nose is almost parallel to that of the skull and is slightly longer than the distance between the stop and the occipital bone.

Skull: Vaulted, with prominent occipital bone. Medium width (at the eyebrows), its width gradually decreases towards the muzzle.

Stop: Mild.

Skull: Nose: The nose is completely black, except for light-colored dogs, which may be brown or liver-colored. Large and well-opened nostrils, the nasal mirror slightly beyond the lips.

Muzzle: The general appearance of the muzzle is dry but not pointed. Lips: The upper lips are well diagonal to the lower lips.

Jaws / Teeth: Strong jaw, with a perfect scissor bite, with the upper incisors close to the lower ones and standing perpendicular to the jawbone.

Eyes: Rhombus-shaped, neither protruding nor too deep set. Other shades up to medium brown are also accepted in dark but light dogs. Calm, serious look. Light or yellow eyes are not desirable.

Ears: Set low, exactly below the line of the eye. They are long, reaching the end of a muzzle of adequate length, but not excessively long. They are thin along their entire length and twist inwards. They are very flexible, delicate and velvety to the touch.

Neck : Muscular, well arched and fairly long, with a pronounced but by no means excessive neck lobe.

Trunk : Long and deep throughout. The mar and hip are at approximately the same height.

Back: Fairly wide and straight. It should not be disproportionately long between the mar and the hips.

Loins: May be slightly curved.

Chest: The forechest fits snugly in the forearm when viewed from the front. It is pronounced sternum, but the chest should be neither narrow nor disproportionately deep. The ribs are well arched, extending far back, without any deformation.

Bottom line and abdomen: There must be sufficient distance between the deepest part of the chest and the ground for the dog to move freely on any type of terrain.

Tail: Well set, rather long, strong at the base, gradually tapering towards the tip; there is a moderate amount of coarse coat on the underside. He wears it in motion in swords, gently arched, holding it upwards. Under no circumstances should you curl or lean over your back.

Limbs

Forelegs:

General Appearance: The upper forearm is set slightly below the body, but should not impede the free movement of the dog, nor should the contact of the front legs in position or movement. The skin in the middle of the foot may be slightly wrinkled, but this should not be excessive.

Shoulders: Shoulders reach well back; the shoulders are not too heavy.

Elbows: Elbows close to the side of the body, not turning inwards or outwards.

Forearm: Short, strong boned.

Feet: A forward heel is not desirable.

Forefeet: Large, well supported, with thick pads. The front paws turn straight forward or slightly outwards, but the dog always stands perfectly and regularly if its weight is evenly distributed on the toes and pads, so that his footprints give the impression of a large dog’s footprints.

Hind limbs:

General appearance: Extremely muscular, almost round when viewed from behind. There may be a slight wrinkle between the hock and the paw and a small skin purse may appear at the back of the hock, but none of these should be excessive.

Knee: Well angulated. Hocks: The hocks are deep, the hindquarters slightly sloping, but not turning inwards or outwards, and just below the torso when the dog is naturally standing. / p> Hind feet: Large, well supported, with thick pads. In all cases, a dog will stand perfectly and regularly if its weight is evenly distributed on the toes and pads, so that its footprints give the impression of a large dog’s footprints.

Movement: The most important thing is to make sure your dog is fit for its intended purpose. Smooth, powerful and easy movement, with protruding steps at the front, powerful thrust at the rear. The dog also moves the front and hind limbs correctly. The knee and hip joint should never appear stiff in motion and the fingers should never rub against the ground.

Skin: Loose and supple without exaggeration.

Hair cover

Hair: Smooth, short and dense without being delicate. Clean outlines without flagging. Long, soft coat and flagging are undesirable.

Color: Usually black and white-tan (tricolor); yellow and white (bicolor); but any recognized wear color is accepted.

Size: Height at withers: 33 to 38 cm.

Errors: Any deviation from the above is considered an error and should be judged in proportion to the extent to which it affects the dog’s health, quality of life and ability to perform his / her traditional task / work.

Excluding errors – Aggressive or overly shy behavior – Any dog ​​with a visible physical or behavioral disorder should be excluded.

Note: Males should have two apparently normal testicles located in the scrotum.