TIPS FOR BUYING A PUPPY

  • WHAT TO PAY ATTENTION TO?
  • HOW TO RECOGNIZE A PUPPY MILL?
  • WHO IS A BREEDER?
  • WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR?
  • ADDITIONAL TIPS

Congratulations! You have finally fallen in love with a dog breed and all members of your family have agreed to purchase. You took into account the extra cost and activity of keeping a dog. You already “just” have to decide where to get your puppy. This decision will be a decisive decision for many years to come. It is extremely important for the new member of the family to be able to live a healthy, full life, so it is important to choose a dog with a verifiable bloodline from a quality kennel, and by no means from puppy mills. You have to make a prudent decision as you choose a partner for 10-15 years. Do not buy in an underpass, in a market, or from the trunk of a car. A responsible breeder would never expose puppies to the stress and epidemiological risk that can affect them in such a place, always welcome the buyer at home! Before you make your decision, take a look at some of the breeders! This will provide a basis for comparison.

  • They always have a puppy available.

  • They sell puppies very cheap, almost remarkably cheap.

  • They keep several fashionable breeds at the same time.

  • The puppy is given without a pedigree and it is claimed that this is the reason for the low cost.

  • They give the puppy 5-6 weeks old instead of the ideal 8-9 weeks.

  • Puppies are not adequately vaccinated, dewormed, treated with anti-parasitic products - puppies are not properly socialized, in many cases the owner of the kennel does not even know his dogs, there is no dog-owner contact.

  • When buying, customers are not allowed near adult dogs, parents cannot be seen, or even puppies may be sold from a trunk or in a market.

Anyone who has created a litter at least once is already legally a breeder, yet cannot be automatically called a breeder. It takes something more, as dog breeding is not just one of the most beautiful pursuits in the world or an expensive hobby, but a way of life. Its purpose is not only to produce another litter, but to improve the breed to create better and more beautiful individuals.

In order to become a breeder, you need to know at least the basic level of the dog's anatomy, physiology, behavior, the most important diseases, and the birth process. A breeder can provide accurate information about the origin of his dogs.

Every breeder has a goal. He dreams of what he thinks is the perfect basset, and he plans every mating so that the puppies to be born get as close to this ideal as possible.

Puppies are not completely identical in appearance or character within a litter. However, a breeder knows them so well that he can tell what character each dog will have. Basset puppies are usually sold for the following purposes:

  • Hobby dog, pet:

    Most buyers choose the cheapest puppy closest to where they live. Be aware, however, that there can be huge differences between a hobby dog ​​offered by a breeder and a puppy mill. The breeder works to a much higher standard, so the quality of a hobby dog ​​born with him far exceeds that of a puppy mill. Unfortunately, despite all his good intentions and efforts, a breeder can have a faulty puppy, but the important difference is that He draws the buyer's attention to this fault and does not try to take a rise out of the customer. Very important: even for a hobby dog, health is a basic requirement! Such a puppy has more modest external characteristics, he may have some defect that excludes him from breeding, but does not interfere with his normal life.

  • For breeding purposes:

    A puppy of the near-average appearance, free from substantial defects, on the one hand, and of a prominent, but reticent, contemplative type, on the other, may be suitable for this purpose. None of them will probably be the stars of shows, but they can be first-class breeding dogs with a stable genetic background.

  • For exhibition:

    Only puppies with outstanding looks and a sufficiently lively temperament and a high dose of self-confidence can become a real show dog. It can also be successful as a breeding dog with a good genetic background.

Show and breed dogs should only be purchased from a recognized breeder. Such a breeder is proud of his dogs and strives to show them to as large an audience as possible on every possible forum. He often goes to exhibitions and now it is almost natural to have a website.

The difference in quality is also reflected in the price. A puppy selected for a show or breeding always costs more than a hobby quality. Likewise, the price of a young dog can be much higher than that of a puppy, especially if it already has show results. In determining the price, in addition to the cost of raising the given litter, the costs of keeping the parents, the high fee for mating, shows, the ideal value of the puppy and the many care and attention that is needed during the upbringing are usually taken into account.

Most breeders now sell dogs exclusively on a contract of sale. This is to protect the interests of the puppy, the buyer and the seller, and also serves as a guarantee. The guarantee can only guarantee compensation for any damage that may occur, as even with the best of intentions, one can only hope that the puppy will become a beautiful and healthy adult.

  • Always check your puppy carefully before you buy! Observe for signs of disease, e.g. diarrhea, bloated stomach, heavily secreting eyes, etc.! Try not to go to view the puppy alone. More eyes see more.

  • Puppies should not be taken before the age of 8 weeks! This period is very important in the life of the puppy, as it is when he learns the basic rules of contact with fellow dogs.

  • At 8 weeks of age, the puppy should undergo at least 2 vaccinations and 3-4 deworming and have a chip! Check this in the vaccination book! All vaccinations should be signed and stamped by a veterinarian. The vaccination book should be completed.

At the same time as handing over the puppy, you must receive the following documents: pedigree, vaccination book, certificate of change of ownership, sales contract. A dog purchased without a pedigree can no longer be registered later!

Thanks for reading our tips! This way, we wish you to find the perfect dog, a new family member. We will do our best to make our little “uncut diamonds” the healthiest, but you will have to smooth them to perfection. We wish you all the best!

Congratulations! You have finally fallen in love with a dog breed and all members of your family have agreed to purchase. You took into account the extra cost and activity of keeping a dog. You already “just” have to decide where to get your puppy. This decision will be a decisive decision for many years to come. It is extremely important for the new member of the family to be able to live a healthy, full life, so it is important to choose a dog with a verifiable bloodline from a quality kennel, and by no means from puppy mills. You have to make a prudent decision as you choose a partner for 10-15 years. Do not buy in an underpass, in a market, or from the trunk of a car. A responsible breeder would never expose puppies to the stress and epidemiological risk that can affect them in such a place, always welcome the buyer at home! Before you make your decision, take a look at some of the breeders! This will provide a basis for comparison.

  • They always have a puppy available.

  • They sell puppies very cheap, almost remarkably cheap.

  • They keep several fashionable breeds at the same time.

  • The puppy is given without a pedigree and it is claimed that this is the reason for the low cost.

  • They give the puppy 5-6 weeks old instead of the ideal 8-9 weeks.

  • Puppies are not adequately vaccinated, dewormed, treated with anti-parasitic products – puppies are not properly socialized, in many cases the owner of the kennel does not even know his dogs, there is no dog-owner contact.

  • When buying, customers are not allowed near adult dogs, parents cannot be seen, or even puppies may be sold from a trunk or in a market.

Anyone who has created a litter at least once is already legally a breeder, yet cannot be automatically called a breeder. It takes something more, as dog breeding is not just one of the most beautiful pursuits in the world or an expensive hobby, but a way of life. Its purpose is not only to produce another litter, but to improve the breed to create better and more beautiful individuals.

In order to become a breeder, you need to know at least the basic level of the dog’s anatomy, physiology, behavior, the most important diseases, and the birth process. A breeder can provide accurate information about the origin of his dogs.

Every breeder has a goal. He dreams of what he thinks is the perfect basset, and he plans every mating so that the puppies to be born get as close to this ideal as possible.

Puppies are not completely identical in appearance or character within a litter. However, a breeder knows them so well that he can tell what character each dog will have. Basset puppies are usually sold for the following purposes:

  • Hobby dog, pet:

    Most buyers choose the cheapest puppy closest to where they live. Be aware, however, that there can be huge differences between a hobby dog ​​offered by a breeder and a puppy mill. The breeder works to a much higher standard, so the quality of a hobby dog ​​born with him far exceeds that of a puppy mill. Unfortunately, despite all his good intentions and efforts, a breeder can have a faulty puppy, but the important difference is that He draws the buyer’s attention to this fault and does not try to take a rise out of the customer. Very important: even for a hobby dog, health is a basic requirement! Such a puppy has more modest external characteristics, he may have some defect that excludes him from breeding, but does not interfere with his normal life.

  • For breeding purposes:

    A puppy of the near-average appearance, free from substantial defects, on the one hand, and of a prominent, but reticent, contemplative type, on the other, may be suitable for this purpose. None of them will probably be the stars of shows, but they can be first-class breeding dogs with a stable genetic background.

  • For exhibition:

    Only puppies with outstanding looks and a sufficiently lively temperament and a high dose of self-confidence can become a real show dog. It can also be successful as a breeding dog with a good genetic background.

Show and breed dogs should only be purchased from a recognized breeder. Such a breeder is proud of his dogs and strives to show them to as large an audience as possible on every possible forum. He often goes to exhibitions and now it is almost natural to have a website.

The difference in quality is also reflected in the price. A puppy selected for a show or breeding always costs more than a hobby quality. Likewise, the price of a young dog can be much higher than that of a puppy, especially if it already has show results. In determining the price, in addition to the cost of raising the given litter, the costs of keeping the parents, the high fee for mating, shows, the ideal value of the puppy and the many care and attention that is needed during the upbringing are usually taken into account.

Most breeders now sell dogs exclusively on a contract of sale. This is to protect the interests of the puppy, the buyer and the seller, and also serves as a guarantee. The guarantee can only guarantee compensation for any damage that may occur, as even with the best of intentions, one can only hope that the puppy will become a beautiful and healthy adult.

  • Always check your puppy carefully before you buy! Observe for signs of disease, e.g. diarrhea, bloated stomach, heavily secreting eyes, etc.! Try not to go to view the puppy alone. More eyes see more.

  • Puppies should not be taken before the age of 8 weeks! This period is very important in the life of the puppy, as it is when he learns the basic rules of contact with fellow dogs.

  • At 8 weeks of age, the puppy should undergo at least 2 vaccinations and 3-4 deworming and have a chip! Check this in the vaccination book! All vaccinations should be signed and stamped by a veterinarian. The vaccination book should be completed.

At the same time as handing over the puppy, you must receive the following documents: pedigree, vaccination book, certificate of change of ownership, sales contract. A dog purchased without a pedigree can no longer be registered later!

Thanks for reading our tips! This way, we wish you to find the perfect dog, a new family member. We will do our best to make our little “uncut diamonds” the healthiest, but you will have to smooth them to perfection. We wish you all the best!